Hydroptila cornuta Mosely, 1922

Hydroptila cornuta is one of 25 members of the Family Hydroptilidae found in Ireland, and one of 11 members of the genus Hydroptila. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers and streams on a substratum of algae. Hydroptila cornuta has a case made of sand grains, which is laterally compressed. Only the final instar has a case, and is very different from the earlier instars.

The larvae of most Hydroptilid species are not described. Notable features of the larvae of the genus Hydroptila include a laterally flattened abdomen, which lacks dorsal and ventral ovoid processes, a laterally compressed case made of sand grains (or in one case algal filaments), no sclerotized median point on the labrum, 2nd & 3rd legs at most 1.5 times longer the 1st legs and gill filaments on the anal proleg, the claws of which also have accessory hooks.

Adults of Hydroptila cornuta can be found on the wing from May to September.

There are currently no distribution records available for Hydroptila cornuta in Ireland through the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 11/07/2016

Advertisements

Hydropsyche instabilis (Curtis, 1834)

Hydropsyche instabilis is one of nine members of the Family Hydropsychidae found in Ireland, and one of five of the genus Hydropsyche. It is a species whose larvae can be found in the upper reaches of river systems. Its substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock, but includes plant material and woody debris, in areas with moderate to high current velocities. Its preference is for neutral to alkaline waters.

Hydropsyche instabilis lives up to one year and has a univoltine reproductive cycle (one generation per year) in temperate areas. Its feeding ecology is mainly passive filter feeding, with some predation and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Hydropsyche instabilis include the presence of large, rectangular dorsal plates on all three thoracic segments, tufted gills on the abdominal segments up to and including the 7th segment, the lack of long bristles on the front margin of the pronotum, partially pigmented posterior prosternites, a frontoclypeal pattern of separated aboral and lateral marks, a U- or V-shaped aboral mark and a U-shaped frontoclypeus.

Adults of Hydropsyche instabilis can be found on the wing from May to August, though occasionally recorded as early as April.

Records of Hydropsyche instabilis on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

Last updated: 31/05/2016

Goera pilosa (Fabricius, 1775)

Goera pilosa is one of three members of the Family Goeridae, and the sole representative of the genus Goera, found in Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams and lakes with a substratum preference ranging from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock. Goera pilosa has a tubular case made of sand grains, with large ballast stones attached along the side.

In terms of feeding, this species is largely a grazer/scraper, though some gathering/collecting is evident.

The larvae of the Family Goeridae are easily recognisable due to the presence of an anterior process on the mesopleurite that extends free from the body wall and also the construction of the case, with its large ballast stones along the side. The larvae of Goera pilosa can be separated from the genus Silo by the bluntly pointed shape of the mesonotal lateral sclerites (adjacent to the mesopleurite) and the bulbous shape of the posterior of the fronto-clypeal apotome.

Adults of Goera pilosa can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Goera pilosa on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 31/05/2016

Additional records have been added to the Trichoptera (caddisflies) of Ireland dataset on the National Biodiversity Data Centre (http://maps.biodiversityireland.ie/#/DataSet/165) bringing the total number of records from published sources to 96. The new records range from 1952 to 2000 and include some records for Northern Ireland. These records are based on eight publications. The following list includes the author(s) and year of publication, while the full reference can be found by clicking on the References tab above:

Barnard, P.C. and O’Connor, J.P. (1987)

Baynes, E.S.A. (1953)

Fahy, E. (1973)

Kelly, D.W., Dick, J.T.A., Montgomery, W.I. and MacNeil, C. (2003)

O’Connor, J.P. and Bond, K.G.M. (1995)

O’Connor, J.P. and O’Connor, M.A. (1980)

O’Connor, J.P. and O’Connor, M.A. (1982)

O’Connor, J.P., Good, J.A. and Bond, K.G.M. (1990)

 

 

I’ve added 10 new references to the References page of this blog. These references are papers that include  some reference to Trichoptera in an Irish context.

The following list includes the author(s) and year of publication, while the full reference can be found by clicking on the References tab above:

Byrne & Reynolds (1982)

Cooke (1878)

Giller & Twomey (1993)

Healy (1997)

Healy et al. (1982)

King & Halbert (1910)

McLachlan (1877)

O’Connor (1980)

O’Connor & Wise (1984)

O’Connor & Bracken (1980)

New references added

July 3, 2013

I’ve added 15 new references to the References page of this blog. These references are those on which the ‘Trichoptera (caddisflies) of Ireland’ dataset, mapped here by the National Biodiversity Data Centre, is based. The following list includes the author(s) and year of publication, while the full reference can be found by clicking on the References tab above:

Duke (1994)

Hannigan et al. (2009)

O’Connor (2009; 1982; 1979; 1978; 1977)

O’Connor & Bond (2008)

O’Connor & Good (1984)

O’Connor & O’Hanrahan (1988)

Speight (1990)

Reynolds (1985)

Sweeney (2006)

Wallace et al. (1985)

Wallace et al. (1983)

The first output of my early efforts to collate all the published records of Trichoptera species in Ireland  (with sufficient accompanying data including species name, date, grid reference, recorder name and determiner name) is now available on-line through the National Biodiversity Data Centre website at http://maps.biodiversityireland.ie/#/DataSet/165/General. The dataset contains 73 records of 44 species from 39 locations across Ireland.

I have a number of references still to find and add, and hopefully future publications will provide further distributional data for caddisflies in Ireland.

If you have, or know of any, references that include such distributional data, I would be delighted to hear from you.

Thanks to Dr Eugenie Regan and the National Biodiversity Data Centre for their help in getting this dataset on-line and made available to all.