Limnephilus pati O’Connor, 1980

Limnephilus pati is one of 40 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of 24 members of the genus Limnephilus. The larvae of Limnephilus pati are, as yet, unknown, but are likely to be found in fens. It is thought they are mainly shredders like other limnephilids.

Adults of Limnephilus pati can be found on the wing in Ireland from June to July.

For details of published records of Limnephilus pati, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 16/12/2017

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Beraeodes minutus (Linnaeus, 1761)

Beraeodes minutus is one of three members of the Family Beraeidae found in Ireland, and the sole representative of the genus Beraeodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found amongst the roots of vegetation along the edges of rivers, streams, ponds and lakes, showing little preference for a particular flow regime. The larval case is curved and tapering, and made of sand grains.

The feeding ecology of the larvae of Beraeodes minutus is entirely grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Beraeodes minutus include long, slender antennae, 3rd legs long, head largely dark and pronotum with a dark mosaic pattern.

Adults of Beraeodes minutus can be found on the wing in Ireland in May, though this is based on limited records.

For details of published records of Beraeodes minutus, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 12/12/2017

 

Limnephilus borealis (Zetterstedt, 1840)

Limnephilus borealis is one of 40 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of 24 members of the genus Limnephilus. It is a species whose larvae can be found in ponds and lakes in upland areas. Its substratum preference is predominantly for woody debris, but can be found on plant material, particulate organic matter, mud and sand, in standing water. Limnephilus borealis has a slender, straight case made of butted and overlapping plant fragments.

The feeding ecology of the larvae of Limnephilus borealis is predominantly shredding, with some predation and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Limnephilus borealis include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, some gills with three or more filaments, no femur of the 2nd and 3rd legs with one or more additional setae, no additional setae on the proximal section of the trochanter of the 2nd or 3rd legs, setae of the ventral edge of the femora of the 2nd and 3rd leg all dark, anterior-lateral gills on the 2nd abdominal segment, dark fronto-clypeal and parietal bands on the head, lateral prosternites small and separated from the central prosternite, or with indistinct prosternites, pleural band absent, indistinct or short, side of head pale with strongly contrasting muscle attachment spots.

Adults of Limnephilus borealis can be found on the wing in Britain from August to September, with the Irish specimens recorded in September.

Limnephilus borealis was added to the Irish list in 2017, when it was recorded from Lough Garve, Garron Plateau, Co. Antrim (O’Connor & McNaughton, 2017).

The record has yet to be published on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. and McNaughton, C. (2017) The Caddisfly Limnephilus borealis (Zetterstedt, 1840) (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae): An unexpected addition to the Irish fauna. Entomologist’s Record and Journal of Variation 129: 306-310.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 07/12/2017

The official list of caddisfly species present in Ireland has been increased by one with the confirmation of Limnephilus borealis (Zetterstedt, 1840) through adult material collected in September 2017. Adults suspected to be L. borealis were collected and identified by Cathal McNaughton from Lough Garve on the Garron Plateau, Co. Antrim and the identifications were confirmed by J.P. O’Connor. The Irish list now stands at 151 species; however Tricholeiochiton fagesii (Guinard, 1879) is, as yet, only known from larval material. It almost certain that there will be new additions in the future.

O’Connor, J.P. and McNaughton, C. (2017) The Caddisfly Limnephilus borealis (Zetterstedt, 1840) (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae): An unexpected addition to the Irish fauna. Entomologist’s Record and Journal of Variation 129: 306-310.

Last updated: 07/12/2017

Potamophylax latipennis (Curtis, 1834)

Potamophylax latipennis is one of 40 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of two members of the genus Potamophylax. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams and lakes. Its substratum preference includes particulate organic matter, and stony material from gravel to boulders, in slow-flowing and standing water. Potamophylax latipennis usually has a case made of mineral particles. The larvae show no preference in terms of water’s pH and can be found in brackish waters.

Potamophylax latipennis lives for more than one year. The feeding ecology of its larvae is predominantly shredding, with some grazing and predation.

Characteristic features of the larva of Potamophylax latipennis include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, gills with only single filaments, two anterior-median sclerites on the metadorsum, mandibles with teeth along the edges, no setae proximal to the large primary seta on the femurs of the 2nd and 3rd legs, 1st abdominal protuberance lacking anterior setae, but with a large posterior sclerite with 1-3 holes, anterior intermediate setae of 9th abdominal sclerite as long as or longer than the central intermediate setae and a no pale patch between the eye and the nearest muscle attachment spots posterior to it.

Adults of Potamophylax latipennis can be found on the wing from April to October.

For details of distribution records of Potamophylax latipennis in Ireland available through the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system, click here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 07/12/2017

Potamophylax cingulatus (Stephens, 1837)

Potamophylax cingulatus is one of 40 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of two members of the genus Potamophylax. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams and sometimes upland lakes. Its substratum preference includes particulate organic matter, and stony material from gravel to boulders, in slow-flowing and standing water. Potamophylax cingulatus usually has a case made of mineral particles. The larvae show no preference in terms of water’s pH and can be found in brackish waters.

In temperate areas, Potamophylax cingulatus has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for more than one year. The feeding ecology of its larvae is predominantly shredding, with some grazing and predation.

Characteristic features of the larva of Potamophylax cingulatus include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, gills with only single filaments, two anterior-median sclerites on the metadorsum, mandibles with teeth along the edges, no setae proximal to the large primary seta on the femurs of the 2nd and 3rd legs, 1st abdominal protuberance lacking anterior setae, but with a large posterior sclerite with 1-3 holes, anterior intermediate setae of 9th abdominal sclerite as long as or longer than the central intermediate setae and a pale patch between the eye and the nearest muscle attachment spots posterior to it.

Adults of Potamophylax cingulatus can be found on the wing from (April) July to October.

For details of distribution records of Potamophylax cingulatus in Ireland available through the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system, click here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 04/12/2017

Limnephilus griseus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Limnephilus griseus is one of 40 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of 24 members of the genus Limnephilus. It is a species whose larvae can be found in small, often temporary pools in acidic waters. Its substratum preference is predominantly for plant material (Sphagnum spp.), but occasionally on particulate organic matter, mud and sand, in standing water. Limnephilus griseus has a curved case made of plant material, or partly or entirely of sand grains.

In temperate areas, Limnephilus griseus has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. The feeding ecology of the larvae of Limnephilus griseus is predominantly shredding, with some predation and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Limnephilus griseus include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, some gills with three or more filaments, additional setae on the femora of the 2nd and 3rd legs not confined to the proximal third, ventral edge of the femora of the 2nd and 3rd leg with two strong setae, both dark, ventral edge setae of 1st leg femur pale, pronotum lacking distinct colour contrast between anterior and posterior sections, pleural band absent or indistinct, femur of 1st leg without additional setae, metadorsum with no setae on soft cuticle between posterior sclerites, 9th abdominal sclerite with at least one seta  between innermost and outermost primary setae at least half as long as outermost seta and no (very rarely 1) additional setae on the anterior of the femur of the second leg.

Adults of Limnephilus griseus can be found on the wing in Ireland from May to September.

For details of published records of Limnephilus griseus, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 07/12/2017