Today marks four years since I made my first post to Trichoptera Ireland. I have have continued collecting references related to caddisflies in Ireland, including their biology, ecology and distribution.

The website includes 61 published references related to caddisflies in Ireland gathered in one location (and more to come). In 2016, the site had 1,248 visitors from 74 countries (up from 834 visitors from 57 countries in 2015). The Top 5 countries for 2016 were: Ireland, United Kingdom, United States, Brazil and Germany.

There are now 115 species profiles available on the website, with more being added all the time.

Thanks to all my visitors. I hope you have found something useful here.

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Lype reducta (Hagen, 1868)

Lype reducta is one of nine members of the Family Psychomyiidae found in Ireland, and one of two members of the genus Lype. It is a species whose larvae can be found in marshes, streams and rivers on a substratum of woody debris, building galleries of wood fragments and sand held together by silk. The species has no preference with regard to current, but shows a preference for neutral to alkaline water.

In terms of feeding ecology, the larvae are mainly grazers, with some feeding on woody debris.

Defining features of the larvae of Lype reducta include a lack of abdominal gills, labrum comprising a sclerotized plate, lateral plates on the 2nd and 3rd thoracic segments small, anal prolegs with almost no basal membranous section, pronotum lacking black thickening towards the posterior-lateral corner, anterior section of coxopleurite with one vertical black bar and a frontoclypeus with a pale anterior region and dark posterior region.

The adults of Lype reducta can be found on the wing in (April) June to August.

For details of records of Lype reducta, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 16/01/2017

 

Oecetis furva (Rambur, 1842)

Oecetis furva is one of 24 members of the Family Leptoceridae found in Ireland, and one of five member of the genus Oecetis. It is a species whose larvae can be found in large ponds, lakes, and ditches, on a substratum of living plant material, occurring only in standing water. Oecetis furva has an almost straight, fragile case made of plant fragments. The species has no preference in relation to the pH of the water and can be found in brackish water.

In temperate areas, Oecetis furva has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. In terms of feeding ecology, the larvae are both shredders and predators.

Defining features of the larvae of Oecetis furva include antennae at least six times longer than wide, a mesonotum without dark, curved posterior-lateral projections, mandibles at least three times as long as wide, with a single cutting edge, labrum with numerous setae on the dorsal surface, mesoventer without setae, metaventer with 1-6 setae, head and thoracic sclerites with distinct muscle attachment points, 3rd leg lacking long setal fringes, and 8th abdominal segment with one long seta on each side.

The adults of Oecetis furva can be found on the wing in June to October.

For details of records of Oecetis furva, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 14/01/2017

 

Lepidostoma basale (Kolenati, 1848)

Lepidostoma basale is the one of three members of the Family Lepidostomatidae found in Ireland, and one of two representatives of the genus in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in a range of flowing waters including stony rivers and large streams. Lepidostoma basale’s case is curved and made of sand grains. It has a preference for a substratum of woody debris, but can also be found in particular organic matter (POM), and sediment ranging from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock in slow-flowing and still waters.

In terms of feeding ecology, Lepidostoma basale has a preference for grazing algal tissues, biofilm, etc., woody debris, and shredding fallen leaves.

Characteristic features of the larvae of Lepidostoma basale include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), the lack of a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antennae very close to the front margin of the eye, posterior metadorsal sclerite and anterior-media sclerite with a single seta each, and several setae on the anterior edge of the mesonotum in addition to the anterior-lateral setal group.

Adults of Lepidostoma basale can be found on the wing from May to June.

Records of Lepidostoma basale on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here (presented under the former name Lasiocephala basalis).

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Today marks three years since I made my first post to Trichoptera Ireland. I have have continued collecting references related to caddisflies in Ireland, including their biology, ecology and distribution. Distribution records gathered have gone on to form the Trichoptera (caddisflies) of Ireland data set published online by the National Biodiversity Data Centre.

The website includes 59 published references related to caddisflies in Ireland gathered in one location (and more to come). In 2015, the site had 834 visitors from 57 countries (up from 492 visitors from 49 countries in 2014). The Top 5 countries for 2015 were: Ireland, United Kingdom, United States, France, Germany.

There are now 32 species profiles available on the website, with more being added all the time.

Thanks to all my visitors; I hope you have found something useful here.

Oligotricha striata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Oligotricha striata is one of six members of the Family Phryganeidae found in Ireland, and the only representative of the genus. It is a species whose larvae can be found in the still waters of pools and ditches, particularly those with acid peaty water and Sphagnum mosses. The species shows a preference for acid waters and can occur in brackish waters.

Oligotricha striata has a univoltine reproductive cycle (one generation per year) in temperate regions and lives less than one year. Its feeding ecology is mainly predatory, with some shredding of fallen leaves and plant material, and gathering of fine particulate organic matter (FPOM).

Characteristic features of the larva of Oligotricha striata include the largely unsclerotized mesodorsum and metadorsum, the presence of lateral and dorsal protuberances on the 1st abdominal segment, almost parallel parietal bands running anterior to posterior on the head and continuous with lines on the abdominal segments.

Adults of Oligotricha striata can be found on the wing from July to August.

There are currently no records of Oligotricha striata on the National Biodiversity Data Centre website. The species has not been recorded in Ireland since 1969.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Hydropsyche contubernalis McLachlan, 1865

Hydropsyche contubernalis is one of nine members of the Family Hydropsychidae found in Ireland, and one of five of the genus Hydropsyche. It is a species whose larvae can be found in the lower reaches of large rivers. Its substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock, but includes plant material and woody debris, in areas with moderate to high current velocities.

Hydropsyche contubernalis has a univoltine reproductive cycle (one generation per year) in temperate areas. Its feeding ecology is almost entirely passive filter feeding, with some predation and gathering of fine particulate organic matter (FPOM).

Characteristic features of the larva of Hydropsyche contubernalis include the presence of large, rectangular dorsal plates on all three thoracic segments, tufted gills on the abdominal segments up to and including the 7th segment, the lack of long bristles on the front margin of the pronotum, entirely pale posterior prosternites, a submentum that lacks a central knob and a frontoclypeal pattern unobscured by a mat of setae.

Adults of Hydropsyche contubernalis can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Hydropsyche contubernalis on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

Last updated: 31/05/2016