trichoptera-of-finlandI have just got my hands on the newly-published Trichoptera Larvae of Finland and thought I’d take a moment to write a few lines about it. This attractive hardback publication includes an introduction to the biology and ecology of the caddisflies of Finland and nearby countries, along with dichotomous keys to families and species. In the back, the distributions of all 216 Finnish species are illustrated in distribution maps and also presented in tabular form by region, along with the Red List status of each species. The book is packed with drawings and photographs of caddisfly larvae, identifying features, head capsules and cases.

While clearly this book is most useful to those studying caddisflies in Finland and nearby countries, Ireland shares 109 species with Finland, and so there much to interest Irish workers. I think it is a worthy addition to the libraries of those interested in these fascinating creatures.

Title: Trichoptera Larvae of Finland: A Key to the caddis larvae of Finland and nearby countries
Authors: Aki Rinne & Peter Wiberg-Larsen
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Trificon
ISBN: 978-951-95015-0-5
Year: 2017
Price: €108 (including postage)

Available from: http://www.trificon.fi/

Glyphotaelius pellucidus (Retzius, 1783)

Glyphotaelius pellucidus is one of 39 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and the sole member of the genus Glyphotaelius. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, marshes and ditches, with fallen deciduous leaves. Its substratum preference includes particulate organic matter and plant material, in standing or slow-flowing water. Glyphotaelius pellucidus has a rather distinctive case made with disks cut from leaves on the dorsal and ventral surfaces.

In boreal areas, Glyphotaelius pellucidus has a multivoltine (more than three generations per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. The feeding ecology of the larvae is predominantly shredding, with some predation and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Glyphotaelius pellucidus include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, some gills with three or more filaments, anterior or posterior face of at least one femur of the 2nd and 3rd legs with one or more additional setae, two strong setae on the ventral edge of the femur of the 2nd leg, 1st leg femur proximal seta pale, contrasting with the dark distal seta, while the dorsal and/or posterior faces lack additional setae.

Adults of Glyphotaelius pellucidus can be found on the wing from May to October.

For details of published records of Glyphotaelius pellucidus, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 20/01/2017

Anabolia nervosa (Curtis, 1834)

Anabolia nervosa is one of 39 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of two members of the genus Anabolia. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, lakes, ponds and canals. Its substratum preference includes plant material, particulate organic matter and woody debris, in standing or, occasionally, slow-flowing water. Anabolia nervosa has a distinctive straight case, which can either be made of plant fragments arranged to create a chevron pattern, or of sand grains with one or more long twigs attached along the length.

In temperate areas, Anabolia nervosa has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle. The feeding ecology of its larvae is predominantly shredding, with some predation, grazing and gathering.

Characteristic features of the larva of Anabolia nervosa include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, some gills with three or more filaments, anterior or posterior face of at least one femur of the 2nd and 3rd legs with one or more additional setae, two strong setae on the ventral edge of the femur of the 2nd leg, both 1st leg femur ventral setae pale, and the head with a characteristic pattern of blotches on a pale background.

Adults of Anabolia nervosa can be found on the wing from September to October.

For details of published records of Anabolia nervosa, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 19/01/2017

Anabolia brevipennis (Curtis, 1834)

Anabolia brevipennis is one of 39 members of the Family Limnephilidae found in Ireland, and one of two members of the genus Anabolia. It is a species whose larvae can be found in shallow, often temporary pools, in fens, usually with deciduous trees nearby. Its substratum preference includes plant material, particulate organic matter and woody debris, in standing water (or where there is a very slight flow). Anabolia brevipennis has a rather distinctive case, made of disks cut from leaves, resulting in a straight case with a triangular cross-section.

The feeding ecology of the larvae of Anabolia brevipennis is predominantly shredding, with some predation and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Anabolia brevipennis include a prosternal horn, dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antenna midway between the eye and the anterior head margin, some gills with three or more filaments, anterior or posterior face of at least one femur of the 2nd and 3rd legs with one or more additional setae, two strong setae on the ventral edge of the femur of the 2nd leg, 1st leg femur proximal seta pale, contrasting with the dark distal seta, while the dorsal and/or posterior faces have additional setae.

In Ireland, adults of Anabolia brevipennis have only been found on the wing in August (based on limited records), while the British flight period is given as August to October.

For details of published records of Anabolia brevipennis (listed as Phacopteryx brevipennis), visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 19/01/2017

Tinodes waeneri (Linnaeus, 1758)

Tinodes waeneri is one of nine members of the Family Psychomyiidae found in Ireland, and one of five members of the genus Tinodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found in lakes, rivers, streams and canals, on a substratum of gravel to bedrock, building galleries on rock surfaces in standing to slow-flowing water. The species shows no preference in relation to pH of the water and can be found in brackish water.

In temperate areas, Tinodes waeneri has a variable reproductive cycle and lives for up to one year. In terms of feeding ecology, the larvae are predominantly grazers, with some gathering, passive filter feeding and predation.

Defining features of the larvae of Tinodes waeneri include a lack of abdominal gills, labrum comprising a sclerotized plate, lateral plates on the 2nd and 3rd thoracic segments small, anal prolegs with almost no basal membranous section, pronotum lacking a black thickening towards the posterior-lateral corner, anterior section of 1st leg coxopleurite with two vertical black bars, pronotum with yellow ovoid markings, and frontoclypeus noticeably darker the adjacent areas of the head.

The adults of Tinodes waeneri can be found on the wing from April to November.

For details of records of Tinodes waeneri, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 18/01/2017

 

Tinodes unicolor (Pictet, 1834)

Tinodes unicolor is one of nine members of the Family Psychomyiidae found in Ireland, and one of five members of the genus Tinodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found in streams, on a substratum of gravel to bedrock, building galleries on rock surfaces in moderate to fast-flowing waters. The species shows a preference for alkaline water.

In terms of feeding ecology, the larvae are predominantly grazers, with some gathering and passive filter feeding.

Defining features of the larvae of Tinodes unicolor include a lack of abdominal gills, labrum comprising a sclerotized plate, lateral plates on the 2nd and 3rd thoracic segments small, anal prolegs with almost no basal membranous section, pronotum lacking a black thickening towards the posterior-lateral corner, anterior section of 1st leg coxopleurite with two vertical black bars, pronotum lacking ovoid yellow markings, and labrum uniformly pale.

Adults of Tinodes unicolor have only been found on the wing in July in Ireland, while in Britain the flight period is described as June to September.

For details of records of Tinodes unicolor, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 18/01/2017

 

Tinodes maculicornis (Pictet, 1834)

Tinodes maculicornis is one of nine members of the Family Psychomyiidae found in Ireland, and one of five members of the genus Tinodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found in lakes, rivers and streams, on a substratum of gravel to boulders, building galleries on rock surfaces, with no preference for water flow. The species shows a preference for alkaline water.

In terms of feeding ecology, the larvae are predominantly grazers, with some gathering and passive filter feeding.

Defining features of the larvae of Tinodes maculicornis include a lack of abdominal gills, labrum comprising a sclerotized plate, lateral plates on the 2nd and 3rd thoracic segments small, anal prolegs with almost no basal membranous section, pronotum lacking a black thickening towards the posterior-lateral corner, anterior section of 1st leg coxopleurite with two vertical black bars, pronotum lacking ovoid yellow markings, labrum darkest at the posterior-lateral extensions, frontoclypeus with three similarly size pale spots and no pigmented area on the ventral surface of the 2nd thoracic segment.

Adults of Tinodes maculicornis can be found on the wing from July to September.

For details of records of Tinodes maculicornis, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 18/01/2017