Athripsodes aterrimus (Stephens, 1836)

Athripsodes aterrimus is one of 24 members of the Family Leptoceridae found in Ireland, and one of five members of the genus Athripsodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found in ponds, lakes and slow rivers, on a substratum of sand, mud and plants. Athripsodes aterrimus has a curved case made of sand. This species has no pH preference.

In temperate areas, Athripsodes aterrimus has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. In terms of feeding, this species mainly a shredder, with some gathering and predation.

Defining features of the larvae of Athripsodes aterrimus include a mesonotum with dark, curved posterior-lateral projections, mandibles no more than twice as long as wide, a triangular ventral apotome, and many dagger-shaped setae on the anterior face of the 3rd leg trochanter and femur.

Adults of Athripsodes aterrimus can be found on the wing from June to September (November).

For details of records of Athripsodes aterrimus, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 15/08/2016

Athripsodes albifrons (Linnaeus, 1758)

Athripsodes albifrons is one of 24 members of the Family Leptoceridae found in Ireland, and one of five members of the genus Athripsodes. It is a species whose larvae can be found in large streams, rivers, and lake shores, on a substratum of fine gravel to cobble. Athripsodes albifrons has a curved case made of sand.

In temperate areas, Athripsodes albifrons has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. In terms of feeding, this species mainly a shredder, with some gathering and predation.

Defining features of the larvae of Athripsodes albifrons include a mesonotum with dark, curved posterior-lateral projections, mandibles no more than twice as long as wide, a triangular ventral apotome, no dagger-shaped setae on the anterior face of the 3rd leg trochanter and femur, and the ventral edge of the tibia of the 1st leg with 1-2 setae in addition to the single strong setae at the distal corner.

The adults of Athripsodes albifrons are distinctive, having brown wings with four white marks and a white patch of hair on the head (hence albifrons); however, the form interjectus has black wings, which fade to brown after death. They can be found on the wing from June to September.

For details of records of Athripsodes albifrons, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 11/08/2016

Adicella reducta (McLachlan, 1865)

Adicella reducta is one of 24 members of the Family Leptoceridae found in Ireland, and is the only member of the genus Adicella. It is a species whose larvae can be found in streams, marshes, canals and rivers amongst roots of marginal vegetation and woody debris. Adicella reducta has a straight case made of a spiral of plant material. The species has no preference with regard to pH of the water.

In temperate areas, Adicella reducta has a univoltine (one generation per year) reproductive cycle, and lives for up to one year. In terms of feeding, this species predominantly a shredder, with a little grazing.

Defining features of the larvae of Adicella reducta include the lack of a hooked tarsal claw on the 2nd leg, mandibles no more than twice as long as wide, the lack of posterior-lateral projections from the mesonotum, a dark bar on the posterior of the 1st abdominal lateral sclerite, no median constriction of the tibia and tarsus of the 3rd leg, and 9th abdominal dorsum with 12 setae.

Adults of Adicella reducta can be found on the wing from May to September.

For details of records of Adicella reducta, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 10/08/2016

Wormaldia subnigra McLachlan, 1865

Wormaldia subnigra is one of five members of the Family Philopotamidae found in Ireland, and one of three Irish representatives of the genus along with Wormaldia mediana and Wormaldia occipitalis. This species can be found in large streams and rivers. The substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock. Wormaldia subnigra has a preference for neutral to alkaline waters (pH ≥ 7) and is a filter-feeder, building long, tubular nets attached to rocks; feeding on organic particulate matter. The species lives for over one year.

The larvae of the Family Philopotomidae can be readily separated from those of other families by the fact that they possess a white membranous labrum, with a brush-like anterior margin, as opposed to a sclerotized labrum. The larvae of Wormaldia spp. are separated from the other genre in the family by the smooth curve of the anterior margin of the frontoclypeus. Separation from Wormaldia mediana, and Wormaldia occipitalis in particular, is difficult and adults are likely to be needed to identify to species.

Adults of Wormaldia subnigra can be found on the wing from July to October.

There are currently no records for Wormaldia subnigra available through the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. (1968) Habitat preferences in net-spinning caddis larvae with special reference to the influence of water velocity. Journal of Animal Ecology 37(3): 675-692.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated 09/08/2016

Wormaldia occipitalis (Pictet, 1834)

Wormaldia occipitalis is one of five members of the Family Philopotamidae found in Ireland, and one of three Irish representatives of the genus along with Wormaldia mediana and Wormaldia subnigra. This species can be found in small streams and trickles. The substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock. Wormaldia occipitalis has a preference for neutral to alkaline waters (pH ≥ 7) and is a filter-feeder, building long, tubular nets attached to rocks; feeding on organic particulate matter. The species lives for over one year.

The larvae of the Family Philopotomidae can be readily separated from those of other families by the fact that they possess a white membranous labrum, with a brush-like anterior margin, as opposed to a sclerotized labrum. The larvae of Wormaldia spp. are separated from the other genre in the family by the smooth curve of the anterior margin of the frontoclypeus. Separation from Wormaldia mediana, and Wormaldia subnigra in particular, is difficult and adults are likely to be needed to identify to species.

Adults of Wormaldia occipitalis can be found on the wing from March to October.

For details of records of Wormaldia occipitalis, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. (1968) Habitat preferences in net-spinning caddis larvae with special reference to the influence of water velocity. Journal of Animal Ecology 37(3): 675-692.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated 08/08/2016

Wormaldia mediana McLachlan, 1878

Wormaldia mediana is one of five members of the Family Philopotamidae found in Ireland, and one of three Irish representatives of the genus along with Wormaldia occipitalis and Wormaldia subnigra. This species can be found in fast-flowing streams. The substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock. Wormaldia mediana has a preference for neutral to alkaline waters (pH ≥ 7) and is a filter-feeder, building long, tubular nets attached to rocks; feeding on organic particulate matter. The species lives for over one year.

The larvae of the Family Philopotomidae can be readily separated from those of other families by the fact that they possess a white membranous labrum, with a brush-like anterior margin, as opposed to a sclerotized labrum. The larvae of Wormaldia spp. are separated from the other genre in the family by the smooth curve of the anterior margin of the frontoclypeus. Separation from Wormaldia occipitalis, and Wormaldia subnigra in particular, is difficult and adults are likely to be needed to identify to species.

Adults of Wormaldia mediana can be found on the wing from July to August.

There are currently no distribution records for Wormaldia mediana on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. (1968) Habitat preferences in net-spinning caddis larvae with special reference to the influence of water velocity. Journal of Animal Ecology 37(3): 675-692.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated 07/08/2016

Polycentropus kingi McLachlan, 1881

Polycentropus kingi is one of eleven members of the Family Polycentropodidae found in Ireland, and one of three members of the genus Polycentropus. It is a species whose larvae can be found in streams and rivers. Its shows a clear preference for a substratum of gravel and cobble.

Characteristic features of the larva of Polycentropus kingi include a basal membranous section of the anal proleg equal in length to the distal sclerotized section, obtuse-angled anal claws without four blunt teeth on the inside edge, tarsus of the 1st leg less than half the length of the tibia and pigmented areas on the dorsal surface of the head.

Adults of Polycentropus kingi can be found on the wing from July to September.

For distribution records of Polycentropus kingi, visit the National Biodiversity Data Centre page here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 06/08/2016