Apatania wallengreni McLachlan, 1871

Apatania wallengreni is one of three members of the Family Apataniidae, and of the genus Apatania, found in Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in large stony lakes, on a substratum ranging from gravel to boulders and bedrock. It can be found in brackish waters.

Characteristic features of the larva of Apatania wallengreni include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, lack of folds on the ventral apotome, single gill filaments on the abdomen, a lack of anterior-median sclerites, mandibles lacking teeth, dagger-shaped setae on the anterior edge of the pronotum. 6-8 setae along the posterior edge of the lateral sclerite of the anal proleg, and a lack posterior-dorsal gill on the 1st abdominal segment.

Adults of Apatania wallengreni can be found on the wing from April to June.

Records of Apatania wallengreni on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Apatania muliebris McLachlan, 1866

Apatania muliebris is one of three members of the Family Apataniidae, and of the genus Apatania, found in Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in streams and trickles, on a substratum ranging from gravel to boulders and bedrock.

In temperate areas, Apatania muliebris is thought to have a univoltine reproductive pattern (one generation per year), though it is possibly bivoltine (two generations per year). In terms of feeding, this species is both a grazer/scraper and a gatherer/collector.

Characteristic features of the larva of Apatania muliebris include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, lack of folds on the ventral apotome, single gill filaments on the abdomen, a lack of anterior-median sclerites, mandibles lacking teeth, and long, tapering setae on the anterior edge of the pronotum.

Adults of Apatania muliebris can be found on the wing from April to September.

Records of Apatania muliebris on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Apatania auricula (Forsslund, 1930)

Apatania auricula is one of three members of the Family Apataniidae, and of the genus Apatania, found in Ireland. It is not found in Britain. It is a species whose larvae can be found on stony lake shores in the south-west, on a substratum ranging from gravel to boulders and bedrock.

Characteristic features of the larva of Apatania auricula include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, lack of folds on the ventral apotome, single gill filaments on the abdomen, a lack of anterior-median sclerites, mandibles lacking teeth, dagger-shaped setae on the anterior edge of the pronotum, only 5 setae along the posterior edge of the lateral sclerite of the anal proleg and usually with a posterior-dorsal gill on the 1st abdominal segment.

Adults of Apatania auricula can be found on the wing from January to May and July to November.

Records of Apatania auricula on the National Biodiversity Data Centre website can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Lepidostoma hirtum (Fabricius, 1775)

Lepidostoma hirtum is the one of three members of the Family Lepidostomatidae found in Ireland, and one of two representatives of the genus in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, large streams and stony lake shores. The case of Lepidostoma hirtum larvae is composed of sand grains in early instars, but by instar V it has usually changed to one made mostly or entirely of plant fragments, with a square cross-section. It has a preference for a substratum of woody debris, but can also be found in particular organic matter (POM), and sediment ranging from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock in slow-flowing and still waters. The species shows no preference for water pH and can be found in brackish water.

In terms of feeding ecology, Lepidostoma hirtum has a preference for grazing algal tissues, biofilm, etc., woody debris, and shredding fallen leaves.

Characteristic features of the larvae of Lepidostoma hirtum include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), the lack of a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antennae very close to the front margin of the eye, posterior metadorsal sclerite and anterior-media sclerite with a single seta each, and a single seta on the anterior edge of the mesonotum in addition to the anterior-lateral setal group (when headwidth is greater than 0.3 mm).

Adults of Lepidostoma hirtum can be found on the wing from May to October.

Records of Lepidostoma hirtum on the National Biodiversity Data Centre page can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 13/02/2016

Lepidostoma basale (Kolenati, 1848)

Lepidostoma basale is the one of three members of the Family Lepidostomatidae found in Ireland, and one of two representatives of the genus in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in a range of flowing waters including stony rivers and large streams. Lepidostoma basale’s case is curved and made of sand grains. It has a preference for a substratum of woody debris, but can also be found in particular organic matter (POM), and sediment ranging from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock in slow-flowing and still waters.

In terms of feeding ecology, Lepidostoma basale has a preference for grazing algal tissues, biofilm, etc., woody debris, and shredding fallen leaves.

Characteristic features of the larvae of Lepidostoma basale include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), the lack of a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antennae very close to the front margin of the eye, posterior metadorsal sclerite and anterior-media sclerite with a single seta each, and several setae on the anterior edge of the mesonotum in addition to the anterior-lateral setal group.

Adults of Lepidostoma basale can be found on the wing from May to June.

Records of Lepidostoma basale on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here (presented under the former name Lasiocephala basalis).

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Crunoecia irrorata (Curtis, 1834)

Crunoecia irrorata is the one of three members of the Family Lepidostomatidae found in Ireland, and the sole representative of the genus in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in woodland trickles and streams, being found at the edge of waterbodies and in moist substrata. Crunoecia irrorata has a rather distinctive case, which is initially made of sand grains and has a circular cross-section before generally changing to plant material, resulting in a case with a square cross-section.

In terms of feeding ecology, Crunoecia irrorata has a preference for woody debris, with some shredding of fallen leaves, etc., and predation.

Characteristic features of the larvae of Crunoecia irrorata include the presence of a prosternal horn visible on the ventral side of the pronotum (can be difficult to see without manipulating the legs), the lack of a dorsal protuberance on the 1st abdominal segment, antennae very close to the front margin of the eye, and posterior metadorsal sclerite with more than one seta, contrasting with single seta of the anterior-median sclerite.

Adults of Crunoecia irrorata can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Crunoecia irrorata on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system, can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

Phryganea bipunctata Retzius, 1783

Phryganea bipunctata is one of seven members of the Family Phryganeidae found in Ireland, and one of two representatives of the genus. It is a species whose larvae can be found in ponds, lakes, canals and slow-moving rivers. Its substratum preference includes woody debris, coarse and fine particulate organic matter, plants and mud. The species shows no preference for the pH of the water and can occur in brackish waters.

Phryganea bipunctata has a univoltine reproductive cycle (one generation per year) in temperate regions and lives less than one year. Its feeding ecology is mainly predatory, with some shredding of fallen leaves and plant material, gathering of fine particulate organic matter (FPOM), and grazing.

Characteristic features of the larva of Phryganea bipunctata include the largely unsclerotized mesodorsum and metadorsum, the presence of lateral and dorsal protuberances on the 1st abdominal segment, parietal bands converging around the back of the head and extending forward as far as the mandibles, the absence of a prosternite, and the coxal combs of the 1st and second legs arranged 2-4 reasonably regular longitudinal rows.

Adults of Phryganea bipunctata can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Phryganea bipunctata on the National Biodiversity Data Centre website can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 10/07/2017