Odontocerum albicorne (Scopoli, 1763)

Odontocerum albicorne is the only member of the Family Odontoceridae found in Ireland, and indeed the sole representative of the family in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in stony rivers and streams. Its substratum preference ranges from sand to boulders and bedrock, while it can also be found in woody debris. Odontocerum albicorne has a rather distinctive case, made of sand grains, but is notable in that, rather than the sand grains being attached to an inner silk tube, each sand grain is connected to the next by silk and reinforced with silk braces. The posterior of the case is closed off by a pebble. The species has a preference for neutral waters.

Odontocerum albicorne has a univoltine reproductive cycle (one generation a year) and lives longer than one year. Its feeding ecology includes predation, grazing and shredding.

The larva of Odontocerum albicorne are similar to those of Sericostoma personatum. Separating features of Odontocerum albicorne include the lack of accessory hooks on the claws of the anal proleg and distinct, anchor-shaped mark on the pale fronto-clypeal apotome.

A distinctive feature of the adult of the species is the toothed antennae, visible from certain angles.

Adults of Odontocerum albicorne can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Odontocerum albicorne on the National Biodiversity Data Centre website can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Barnard, P. and Ross E. (2008) Guide to the adult caddisflies or sedge flies (Trichoptera).Field Studies Council AIDGAP. ISBN 978-1-85153-241-4.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated 31/05/2016

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Today marks two years since I made my first post to Trichoptera Ireland. I have have continued collecting references related to caddisflies in Ireland, including their biology, ecology and distribution. Distribution records gathered have gone on to form the Trichoptera (caddisflies) of Ireland data set published online by the National Biodiversity Data Centre.

The website includes 54 published references related to caddisflies in Ireland gathered in one location (and more to come). In 2014, the site had 492 visitors from 49 countries (up from 258 visitors from 40 countries in 2013). The Top 5 countries for 2014 are: Ireland, United Kingdom, United States, France, Germany. Thanks to all my visitors; I hope you have found something useful here.

Goera pilosa (Fabricius, 1775)

Goera pilosa is one of three members of the Family Goeridae, and the sole representative of the genus Goera, found in Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams and lakes with a substratum preference ranging from coarse gravel to boulders and bedrock. Goera pilosa has a tubular case made of sand grains, with large ballast stones attached along the side.

In terms of feeding, this species is largely a grazer/scraper, though some gathering/collecting is evident.

The larvae of the Family Goeridae are easily recognisable due to the presence of an anterior process on the mesopleurite that extends free from the body wall and also the construction of the case, with its large ballast stones along the side. The larvae of Goera pilosa can be separated from the genus Silo by the bluntly pointed shape of the mesonotal lateral sclerites (adjacent to the mesopleurite) and the bulbous shape of the posterior of the fronto-clypeal apotome.

Adults of Goera pilosa can be found on the wing from May to September.

Records of Goera pilosa on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 31/05/2016