Sericostoma personatum (Kirby & Spence, 1826)

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Sericostoma personatum in the Ox Mountains, Co. Sligo. Photograph by John Brophy

Sericostoma personatum is the only member of the Family Sericostomatidae found in Ireland, and the sole representative of the genus in Britain and Ireland. It is a species whose larvae can be found in rivers, streams and stony lakes. Its substratum preference ranges from sand to cobble, while it can also be found in particulate organic matter and woody debris. Sericostoma personatum has a rather distinctive case, made of glued-together sand grains. The species has a preference for neutral to alkaline waters.

Sericostoma personatum has a semivoltine reproductive cycle (one generation in two years) and lives longer than one year. Its feeding ecology falls almost entirely in the shredder category, with some evidence of predation.

Characteristic features of the larva of Sericostoma personatum include the accessory hooks present on the claws of the anal proleg and an anterior-lateral corner of the pronotum either prolonged or angular, never smoothly rounded.

A feature of the adult male of the species is the highly modified maxillary palp, which forms a mask-like structure over the front of the head.

Adults of Sericostoma personatum can be found on the wing from (April) May to September.

Records of Sericostoma personatum on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Barnard, P. and Ross E. (2008) Guide to the adult caddisflies or sedge flies (Trichoptera).Field Studies Council AIDGAP. ISBN 978-1-85153-241-4.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Wallace, I.D., Wallace, B. and Philipson, G.N. (2003) Keys to the Case-bearing Caddis Larvae of Britain and Ireland. Scientific Publication of the Freshwater Biological Association No. 61.

Last updated: 06/07/2016

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Philopotamus montanus (Donovan, 1813)

Adult Philopotamus montanus from a stream in Co. Kerry. Photo by John Brophy.

Adult Philopotamus montanus from a stream in Co. Kerry. Photo by John Brophy.

Philopotamus montanus is one of five members of the Family Philopotamidae found in Ireland, and the sole Irish representative of the genus. This species can be found in upland, stony streams, often with rapids running over boulders. The substratum preference ranges from coarse gravel to boulders, with high current velocities. Philopotamus montanus has a preference for neutral to alkaline waters (pH ≥ 7) and is a filter-feeder, building long, tubular nets attached to rocks; feeding on small, particulate matter. The species exhibits a univoltine reproductive pattern.

The larvae of the Family Philopotomidae can be readily separated from those of other families by the fact that they possess a white membranous labrum, with a brush-like anterior margin, as opposed to a sclerotized labrum. Philopotamus montanus is identified by the presence of a shallow, v-shaped notch in the anterior margin of the frontoclypeus. In addition to this, the black pigment band running along the side of the pronotum is contiguous with the black band running across the rear of the pronotum.

Adults of Philopotamus montanus can be found on the wing from February to October.

Philopotamus montanus is also known by its common name yellow spotted sedge.

Records of Philopotamus montanus on the National Biodiversity Data Centre mapping system can be found here.

References

Barnard, P. and Ross, E. (2012) The Adult Trichoptera (Caddisflies) of Britain and Ireland. RES Handbook Volume 1, Part 17.

Edington, J.M. and Hildrew, A.G. (1995) A Revised Key to the Caseless Caddis Larvae of the British Isles: with notes on their ecology. Freshwater Biological Association Special Publication No. 53.

Graf, W., Murphy, J., Dahl, J., Zamora-Muñoz, C. and López-Rodríguez, M.J. (2008) Distribution and Ecological Preferences of European Freshwater Species. Volume 1: Trichoptera. Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber & Daniel Hering (eds). Pensoft, Sofia-Moscow.

O’Connor, J.P. (2015) A Catalogue and Atlas of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Ireland. Occasional Publication of the Irish Biogeographical Society, No. 11.

Last updated: 31/05/2016

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